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Bloody nose attack?

Recently I have read in multiple publications the exact same article—verbatim.  I guess some must think that because it is printed in so many publications that it must be true.  Well, maybe.  The articles say that the US is considering what is called a bloody nose attack against North Korea.  What is a bloody nose attack you ask?

A bloody nose attack is said to be an effort to destroy the next missile that Kim Jun Un launches.  The idea is to intercept the missile early in the launch phase.  The goal is to show the North Koreans that the US is serious about its demands of limits on North Korean missiles and nuclear weapons.  Many argue that such an attack is fraught with dangers,

  • How will the North Koreans respond? Will they perceive this action for what it is a limited attack?  If they do not perceive this or do not wish to perceive it those that are against the attack fear that they will respond massively against South Korea.
  • What if the attempt fails? The prestige of the US will be greatly reduced, the pundits argue, and that of the North Koreans enhanced.
  • What if the attack succeeds? The North Koreans will have been embarrassed and because of the loss of face will either retaliate or be more willing to negotiate since it had been shown that their missiles could be intercepted.

I should also note that several congressmen have reported that F-35s with heat seeking missiles could destroy any missile in the launch phase.  Most of such reports do not link this to the time it takes the North to prepare a missile for launch or the ability of US intelligence to “see” the preparations and thus put the F-35s on station.   (I have been amazed that this information was leaked, but maybe it is part of my fourth option below.

The media is reporting that the National Security Advisor supports the attack while the Secretaries of State and Defense oppose it.  One almost never reads anything about the positions the LTG McMaster has supported.  Such deliberations are usually one thing that remain secret in a leaky administration.  This leads me to my fourth option.

The fourth option is a psychological warfare against the North designed to ratchet up the pressure.  One could argue that the saber rattling and now the threats of a bloody nose attack are designed to force the North Koreans to seek alternative ways to lower the pressure.  If one buys this strategy he could say: “Look it is succeeding.”  The North Koreans have in fact held talks with the South Koreans that have reduced the pressure some.  Possibly, in response to this, President Trump has stated his willingness to negotiate with the North Koreans.

Only time will tell how this will play out but the saber rattling psychological pressure may have worked.  If it worked the next question is why previous administrations did not try such an approach?  The answer probably has something to do with hutzpah and the willingness to go as far as necessary.  We will see.


3 Comments

  1. colonelbruce says:

    News reports subsequent to the publication of this article reported that President Trump had denied considering such an attack. This tends to confirm option 4 in the article.

    Like

  2. johnbalanco says:

    RIGHT ON!

    Like

  3. colonelbruce says:

    Hope you are reading the Khe Sanh articles

    Like

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